What Lenders Should Know About a Reverse 1031 Exchanges | DST Investment

If you are a lender, it’s important to be aware of the different types of 1031 exchanges that your borrowers might pursue. In a traditional 1031 exchange, also known as a forward 1031 exchange, the investor sells their property and then uses the proceeds to purchase replacement property within a certain time frame. A reverse 1031 exchange, on the other hand, is when the replacement property is purchased first, and then the original property is sold.

There are a few key things that lenders should know about reverse 1031 exchanges. However, let’s first discuss what a 1031 exchange is and why it’s beneficial.

A 1031 exchange is a tax-deferred real estate transaction. This means that the investor can sell their property and not pay any capital gains taxes on the sale as long as they use the proceeds to purchase replacement property within a certain time frame. This can be a huge benefit, as it allows investors to keep more of their money and use it for other purposes.

Now that we’ve covered the basics of 1031 exchanges, let’s take a look at reverse 1031 exchanges. The first thing to know is that reverse 1031 exchanges are not as common as traditional 1031 exchanges. This is because there are some added complexities and risks involved in reverse exchanges. For example, the investor needs to make sure that they don’t run out of time to complete the exchange and that they find a qualified intermediary to help with the process.

Another key thing to know about reverse 1031 exchanges is that they work in reverse order. This means that the replacement property is purchased first, and then the original property is sold. This can be beneficial for investors who want to lock in their purchase price before selling their property. However, it’s important to note that this also means that the investor needs to have the funds available to purchase the replacement property upfront.

Which Exchange is Right for My Client?

As a lender, you might be wondering which type of exchange is right for your client. The answer to this question depends on a number of factors, including the timing of the sale and purchase, the availability of funds, and the risk tolerance of the investor.

If your borrower is looking to complete a 1031 exchange, it’s important to ask them about their timeline and whether they have the funds available to purchase the replacement property upfront. If they are looking to complete a reverse 1031 exchange, it’s important to make sure that they understand the added risks involved.

No matter what type of 1031 exchange your borrower is looking to complete, it’s important to make sure that they are working with a qualified intermediary. A qualified intermediary is a professional who helps to facilitate the exchange and ensures that all of the rules and regulations are followed.

If you have any questions about 1031 exchanges, or if you’re looking for a qualified intermediary to help with your next exchange, please contact us. We would be happy to help you through the process.

What is a Reserve First Scenario?

In a reverse first scenario, the Exchange Accommodator Titleholder (EAT) is created when the EAT purchases the Replacement Property (RP) first, on behalf of the Exchanger. The EAT holds title to the RP until the Exchanger identifies their desired property (or properties), which they must do within 45 days of purchasing the RP. At that time, the EAT transfers the title of the RP to the Exchanger. The Exchanger has up to 180 days to sell their old property and may do so in multiple sales as long as all proceeds are properly accounted for and used to close on the RP.

What is a Reverse Last Scenario?

In a reverse last scenario, also known as a delayed exchange, the title of the Replacement Property is transferred to an Exchange Accommodation Titleholder (EAT) first. The EAT then sells the RP to the Exchanger. The Exchanger then has up to 180 days to sell their old property and must use all proceeds to close on the RP.

Risks and Benefits of Reverse 1031 Exchanges

There are a few key risks and benefits that investors should be aware of when considering a reverse 1031 exchange:

Benefits:

1. Ability to lock in the purchase price – One of the biggest benefits of a reverse 1031 exchange is that investors can lock in their purchase price before selling their property. This can be especially helpful for investors who are worried about market fluctuations.

2. Increased flexibility – Another benefit of a reverse 1031 exchange is increased flexibility. This is because investors are not tied to a specific property and can choose from a variety of different properties.

3. Ability to sell in multiple sales – In a reverse 1031 exchange, investors are able to sell their property in multiple sales as long as they properly account for the proceeds. This can be helpful for investors who want to sell their property quickly.

Risks:

1. Need for funding upfront – One of the biggest risks of a reverse 1031 exchange is that investors need to have the funds available to purchase the replacement property upfront. This can be a challenge for some investors.

2. Increased complexity – Another risk of a reverse 1031 exchange is that it can be more complex than a traditional 1031 exchange. This is because there are a few more steps involved in the process.

3. Added costs – In a reverse 1031 exchange, investors may also incur additional costs, such as appraisal fees and title insurance premiums.

Factors Lenders Should Consider

When considering a loan for a borrower who is looking to complete a reverse 1031 exchange, there are a few key factors that lenders should consider:

1. The borrower’s timeline – It’s important to ask the borrower about their timeline and whether they have the funds available to purchase the replacement property upfront.

2. The type of property being exchanged – It’s also important to ask the borrower about the type of property they are looking to exchange. Reverse 1031 exchanges can be complex, so it’s important to make sure the borrower is well-informed about the process.

3. The value of the replacement property – In a reverse 1031 exchange, the replacement property must have a higher value than the property being exchanged. Lenders should consider this when evaluating the loan.

4. The borrower’s financial situation – As with any loan, lenders should evaluate the borrower’s financial situation to ensure they will be able to make the payments on the loan.

5. The risks involved – There are a few risks involved in a reverse 1031 exchange, so it’s important for lenders to be aware of them before approving a loan.

Reverse 1031 exchanges can be complex transactions, so it’s important for lenders to ask the right questions and evaluate all the risks involved before approving a loan. By understanding the basics of reverse 1031 exchanges, lenders can help borrowers successfully complete this type of transaction.

agreement

Need more information?

please leave your email address and we will send you some of our FREE GUIDES! If you want to talk to an expert right now - don't hesitate to give us a call

 

714-627-4414

Thank you! You will receive your guides shortly!