1031 Exchanges: Learn When it is the Best Choice | DST Investment

If you’re like most people, you probably have at least one investment property. Maybe you’re a landlord who owns a few rental homes, or maybe you’ve been lucky enough to snag a piece of the hot housing market and now own a second home that you rent out part-time. Whatever the case may be, if you’re looking to sell one of your investment properties, it’s important to know when a 1031 exchange might be the best option and when it’s not.

First things first: What is a 1031 Exchange?

A 1031 exchange is simply a way to defer paying taxes on the sale of an investment property. Normally, when you sell an investment property, you would have to pay capital gains taxes on any profits that you made. However, if you do a 1031 exchange, you can postpone those taxes and reinvest the money from the sale into another investment property.

These days, 1031 exchanges are more popular than ever, thanks in part to the current housing market. With prices soaring in many parts of the country, investors are increasingly using 1031 exchanges to buy multiple investment properties and build their portfolios.

There are a few things to keep in mind when deciding whether or not to do a 1031 exchange:

1. You can’t do a 1031 exchange if you’ve already taken possession of the money from the sale of your property. In other words, you have to reinvest all of the proceeds from the sale into another property within 180 days.

2. You also can’t do a 1031 exchange if you’ve already started construction on a new property.

3. There are a few other minor restrictions, but those are the two big ones to keep in mind.

Now that we’ve covered the basics, let’s take a look at some of the top reasons why you might want to do a 1031 exchange:

1. You want to reinvest your profits into another property. This is probably the most common reason for doing a 1031 exchange. When you sell an investment property, you can use the money to buy another property or reinvest it in something else, like stocks or bonds.

2. You don’t want to pay capital gains taxes. As we mentioned earlier, capital gains taxes can be pretty hefty, especially if you’ve made a lot of money on the sale of your property. By doing a 1031 exchange, you can postpone those taxes and reinvest the money into another property.

3. You’re looking to buy multiple investment properties. A 1031 exchange can be a great way to quickly build your portfolio of investment properties.

4. You want to avoid the hassle of selling your property. This one’s a little bit more subjective, but sometimes it’s just easier to do a 1031 exchange than go through the hassle of selling your property.

Now that we’ve covered some of the top reasons to do a 1031 exchange, let’s take a look at some of the things you need to keep in mind when pursuing one:

1. Make sure you reinvest all of the proceeds from the sale into another property within 180 days. Otherwise, you’ll have to pay capital gains taxes on the entire sale.

2. Make sure you’re aware of the other restrictions that apply to 1031 exchanges. There are a few minor ones, but the two big ones are mentioned earlier in this article.

3. Plan ahead! Doing a 1031 exchange can be a lot more complicated than simply selling your property. Make sure you know what you’re doing and talk to an accountant or tax lawyer if you have any questions.

When To Avoid a 1031 Exchange

Despite the many benefits of doing a 1031 exchange, there are a few situations where it might not be the best option. Here are a few of them:

1. You don’t have enough money to buy another property. This is probably the biggest reason why people avoid doing 1031 exchanges. Reinvesting all of the proceeds from the sale into another property can be a lot of money, especially if you’re looking to buy more expensive property.

2. You’re not sure what you want to do with your money. If you’re not sure what you want to do with the money from the sale of your investment property, a 1031 exchange might not be the best option.

3. You want to use the money to pay off your mortgage. This one’s a little bit more complicated, but if you want to use the money from the sale of your property to pay off your mortgage, you can’t do a 1031 exchange.

4. You’re not sure when you want to sell your property. If you’re not sure when you want to sell your investment property, a 1031 exchange might not be the best option.

5. You don’t want to reinvest in another property. Maybe you’ve made enough money on the sale of your investment property and don’t want to reinvest it into another property. In that case, a 1031 exchange isn’t for you.

As you can see, there are a lot of things to consider when deciding whether or not to do a 1031 exchange. The bottom line is that it’s a great option for many people, but it’s not the right choice for everyone. Talk to an accountant or tax lawyer if you’re still unsure about whether or not a 1031 exchange is right for you.

When To Contact a Licensed Professional

If you’re thinking about doing a 1031 exchange, it’s always a good idea to contact a licensed professional. They can help make sure you’re aware of all the restrictions that apply to 1031 exchanges and help make the process go as smoothly as possible. If you’re in the market for a new investment property, a 1031 exchange might be the right choice for you. Contact an accountant or tax lawyer to learn more about this complex but powerful tool.

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